Coming of Age – Transition Planning with Autism

Coming of age can be a bittersweet and anxiety-ridden time for both parents and children. Graduating from high school, finding a job, going to college, paying bills,  and living independently are just a few of the major milestones. The list could go on and on. The road to adulthood is probably something parents of children on the spectrum have fretted over since the toddler years, and something children have anticipated for years. Careful planning for this transition should be an important part of the high school years. Let’s take a closer look at transition planning and some resources that will help you.

According the Interactive Autism Network, an unprecedented number of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will leave high school and flood the U.S. adult disability system in the next couple of years. An estimated 50,000 Americans with ASD will turn 18 each year, as a part of “a surge of children” diagnosed in the 1990s. Planning ahead can mean the difference between gaining the right assistance for your adult-child and having to fight to gain access being offered to a growing number of people. Need help with transition planning? There are many resources and toolkits to help you navigate the legal and, sometimes, bureaucratic transition years. 

  • Talk to your child’s team. Include behaviorists, occupational and physical therapists as well as classroom teachers. This group can help you and your child begin the transitioning process very early in the high school years regardless of whether your child is at a specialty school like Milestones or at a public school.
  • Plan for the years after your child turns 21. Students with a disability of any kind are protected by the disabilities act until they turn 21. From there, things get a bit tricky. While your adult-child may be eligible for adult services such as housing assistance, day programs, and career counseling and training, gaining access may be dependent upon funding both locally and nationally. Research what the guidelines are for your area.
  • Research Transitioning Planning toolkits and resources with the help of your child’s team. Autism Speaks has a “Transition Tool Kit” that may help. The Arc- Autism Now also has an excellent list of resources and checklists that can help get you started. The Interactive Autism Network has several toolkits to help plan for job training, college or independent living depending upon your child’s trajectory.