Family Stress and Autism

Raising children can be stressful.  Raising children on the spectrum tends to be even more stress inducing when you factor in therapy appointments, schooling issues, nutritional issues, medical factors, and the list goes on and on. According to Raising Children with Autism online resource, families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often report high levels of stress. In fact, many see it as a normal part of a family’s journey with ASD.

Gender and Stress

In many families, unfortunately, mothers tend to take the brunt of the stress on themselves. Mothers often report feeling stressed more than fathers – possibly because mothers tend to be the primary caregivers in the majority of families. Particular sources of stress for mothers include their children’s unpredictable sleeping patterns, limited ability to express emotion, and fussy eating.  Furthermore, research at the Autism Network has shown that women in families with a child on the spectrum tend to bear the brunt of day-to-day burdens and domestic labor, end up responsible for managing the higher levels of conflict in these families (between autistic and non-autistic siblings, for example), and receive more blame from outsiders and their spouse for their child’s behavior. For fathers, children’s difficult behavior is often reported as a cause of stress. Each family member has their own thing that brings on the stress or pushes buttons to make activities or regular day events stressful. 

Reducing Stress

Researchers at Vanderbilt University – a part of the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network  – report that mothers of children with autism benefit significantly from weekly stress-reduction classes led by other mothers. The classes reduced previously high levels of personal stress, anxiety and depression, and improved the moms’ interactions with their children. The greatest benefits came with a simple “mindfulness” program involving self-relaxation techniques.  For more information about family stress and seeking help, read more at Autism Speaks or at Raising Children with Autism