Practical Tips for Parents – Avoiding Unwanted Behaviors

Let’s face it, we all have bad days every now and then. Usually we deal with the mood and move on. Most of us may even know and understand what caused the mood to begin with and how to avoid it in the future. If you have a child or teen with autism you may have to learn a whole new set of cues to help you understand situations where behavior becomes a problem.

Going out or encountering new stimuli, no matter how much you think you child may enjoy it, can be challenging. Planning in advance can mean the difference between a meltdown or avoiding unwanted behaviors. Here are a few suggestions we found online from parents who have been through this before.

  • Be aware. Many parents know what stimuli whether visual, auditory or other trigger unwanted behaviors. Try avoiding situations that may cause anxiety and stress. For example, your child may enjoy keeping you company on outings but gets tired in the early afternoon, then plan your events for mornings or after a nap. Keep in mind this means that you may need to plan your day around stimuli that may cause problems but it may be worth it in the end.
  • Make Expectations Clear –  You’ll get better cooperation if both you and your child are clear on what’s expected. Sit down with him/her and present the information verbally.

  • Have Options – If your child has meltdowns or is rude to someone in public, you have a few different options. You may need to experiment to determine what works best for your family. Removing the child from the situation may work best but you may also want to consider other options. Some parents have the child calm down and apologize. Even others keep a card in their pocket that explains that their child has autism. Still others only visit outing locations where they know people who are understanding and sympathetic.

  • Talk to the Team – If your child has already been diagnosed, you may want to decide with his/her team of specialists including PT, OT and Behavioral Therapists what behavior modification you will use. If you are all on the same “page” it may make heading off unwanted behaviors easier.
  • Avoid Transitioning without Warning – Transitions can be hard for kids, especially in the middle of something they are enjoying. Having transitional warnings gives children the chance to find a good stopping place for an activity and makes the transition less fraught. Tipping your child off that a transition is coming can ward off meltdown behaviors.