Tips to Beating the Winter Blues

It is not uncommon to feel sad, less energetic, or even irritated when the days get shorter and the winter months close in on all of us. The winter blues impact about 4 to 6 percent of Americans. Another 10 to 20 percent may have mild SAD or Seasonal Affective Disorder. SAD is four times more common in women than in men. Although some children and teenagers get SAD, it usually doesn’t start in people younger than age 20. Given the prevalence of these feelings here are five steps you can take to combat these seasonal blues . . . 

  • Stay Active – While it may be difficult to get outside and be active on the coldest days, it is important to keep moving and stay active. Exercise has been proven to reduce symptoms of depression and make you feel better. Walk the mall, do some yoga at home or just follow along to an exercise video. Your mood may lighten and make you feel less trapped.
  • Turn Up the Light – Our bodies react to the lack of sunlight during the winter months. Dark gloomy mornings can make our days start off with that same mood, as well. Therefore, turn on lights, or invest in a light box or special lamps that mimic natural outdoor light.
  • Get Creative – The winter months may mean that you go to school/work in the dark and return in the dark, but it doesn’t mean you can’t get creative with get-togethers.

    Plan a movie night for yourself or a group of friends. Indulge in a hobby or start a project. Instead of feeling “trapped” inside, make a list of things you enjoy and find ways to engage in those activities.

  • Share your Feelings – Believe it or not, you are not alone in these feelings. The winter blues and even seasonal affective disorder may be impacting people you know. Talk to your parents, friends, relatives and peers about what you are feeling. They may be able to help you cope.
  • Eat Smarter – The old adage “you are what you eat” is very true especially when you are feeling down. Certain foods, like chocolate, can help to enhance your mood and relieve anxiety. Other foods, like candy and carbohydrates provide temporary feelings of euphoria, but could ultimately increase feelings of anxiety and depression.

If you are feeling more than just the winter blues, talk to a teacher, counselor or friend about seeking help to get through the winter months. Children with autism and those on the spectrum, struggle with depression commonly so keep an eye on the winter blues so that they don’t continue for months on end.